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20121201
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Search Results 0 to 32 of about 33 (some duplicates have been removed)
, should be vigorously pursued and the culprits punished. greece, meanwhile, is still struggling to get back on its feet financially. the country would desperately like to have more tax revenues, but it is not enough to just raise taxes for private households. companies would also need to pay their fair share, and there are greek companies which are still doing well despite the financial crisis. but not all are willing to foot the bill for others. that is why some companies are relocating to switzerland, for instance. >> 66-year-old george moved to switzerland 20 years ago to set up a software company in geneva. he made over 200 million euros. now, many of his fellow greeks are looking to follow in his footsteps, and he can see why -- not only does he love the beautiful swiss countryside and the country's efficiency, he also appreciates its low rate of taxation. >> it is not illegal, but morally unacceptable that in some comfort -- countries, you have to pay 50% tax. anybody who wants to have a good quality life -- i find it proper no more. it has to do with tax. >> tax regulation is es
with stefan pedrazzi about whether he believes there are any reasons to be optimistic about greece. >>> and whether volatility triggered by uncertainty over the fiscal cliff should be hear to stay. the fiscal cliff seems to be here to stay, at least. house speaker john boehner has scrapped the deal on plan b. boehner conceded last night he didn't have enough support from republicans to pass the bill which would raise taxes on households making more than $1 is million a year. the house is now in recess until the end of the year. the white house says the president's main priority now is to ensure taxes goes go up for 98% of americans and 97% of small businesses. for more on the tax, we're joined. talk about the cliff. you wake up to the news this morning. what do you make of it? what do you do now? >> i guess what's happening is there is more idealogical battling going on in the republican party than maybe was obvious a little while ago. our baseline view is they will strike a deal either down to the wire or early next year. growth next year will be quite weak. it has to be said that
and stalin of -- >> dividing up -- >> yeah, the british will get 90% of greece. the russians get 90% of bulgaria, and hungary, and divide it up that way. it was pretty cynical. but when roosevelt dies, in april of '45, his last telegram to churchill was, we always have these minor disafremonts with the russians about we end up resolving them so let's not make a big deal. no reason we can't maintain friendship after the war. when truman gets in there in 1945, april 12, he immediately takes a different course. roosevelt's alliance with the wartime alliance with the soviets was still very strong at that point. but truman turns to advisers who roosevelt never trusted in the first place, didn't pay any heed to, people like burns. the second day of the 13th -- burns in south carolina, a private plane, and as -- burns gives them same message, the soviets are break all their agreements. they cannot trusted, and within two weeks the u.s. policy tornado the soviet union is going to change in april of 1945. by the time there's that big meeting on april 23rd with molotov and april 23rd, the uni
the wires. we have quite a bit of support for the euro because of the s.a.p. upgrade on greece and the situation over there. we'll see also the way the market is reacting. let's have a quick look at what the dax is doing. it's been perky, up 0.15%. trading toward the 7,665 level. >> patricia, this comes at a time when people have been focusing on the strength of the euro. as we're over the 1.32 level you mentioned, certainly member countries would like to see a weaker currency. but as long as the surveys hold consistent with strength in the german economy, we're not likely to see that weakening. >> no. absolutely. and the more we get over the entire question will the euro break up or not, as long as that happens we will have some more support in the euro which is not bad if you think about the quantitative easing we've seen in the eurozone and also inflation. that could be the counterpart of the equation, that we still have money being pumped into the economies wheroe ouausterity is going on. we have a little pullback possibly going forward when it comes to the euro. then again
risk at the moment? we'll keep giving greece money because we can't afford not to. we're still waiting maybe for the ecb to step in. what is the till rask? anything we didn't know about? >> lots of things we don't know. that's the problem. it is the unknown unknown as they say. i think greece is probably too small to view. i think what really bothers me is spain which i think clearly bothers the whole market. the question, a growth going to fall off a cliff or whether it muddle through and a bailout will be sufficient. as you say, we don't know the answer to that question. that remains the tail risk. until we do get close to a resolution, i'm not going to turn massively bullish. >> what's your view on that? >> i think i go along very much with what he's saying. >> what is your view on what happens to spanish growth? >> i think spain has a lot of problems at the moment. it's not seeing a lot in the domestic market. not seeing it move toward an export. in which case spanish growth is going to be very, very weak for some time to come. >> all right. good to see you. thanks very much. alan
. there is no argument there as there wasn't for greece. we know the countries, italy, greece is in a crisis and it's a crisis due to lack of competitiveness. going back to the currency, under the currency they create a wave of all sorts of problems including inflation and i think it is not a good route. >> well, i do rather agree with paula on this one. the problem with the euro is it gives you easy and quick solutions. and we're going to keep developing your currency. as you go back to the old days where you keep lowering your currency and you pay relatively high rates on your debt. so the appeal of the euro in the beginning was, oh, chief debt. it looked like christmas. now we're discovering that that regime, a ten-year regime where many peripheral countries got hammered. only germany sort of really held it together. now we have to look at how to undo this. for countries who have no ambition about their future, then maybe the policy is the way to go. italy had so many things going for it that falling back, that seems almost -- >> how about the service in the g-7. >> italy is two countries. it's
and stalin in october of 44. dividing up -- the british forget 90% of greece and the russians would get 90% of bulgaria and hungary and they divided up that way. it was pretty cynical. but when roosevelt dies, in april of 45, his last telegram to churchill was, we always have these minor disagreements with the russians but we end up resolving them. so let's not make a big deal. there's no reason we can't maintain friendship after the war. when truman gets in there on april 12, 1945, immediately takes a different course. roosevelts alliance with the wartime alliance with the soviets was still strong at that point the truman turns to advisers who roosevelt never trusted in the first place and didn't pay heed to. people like burns and second day he flies burns through his private plane and burns gets german the same message. the soviets are breaking all of their agreements and they can't be trusted. and so what we are going to see is within two weeks the u.s. policy toward the soviet union's going to change in april 1945. by the time there's the big meeting on april 23 with molotov and on apr
into the southern belly of the nazi empire, italy and the balkans, regaining greece which is a tremendous story. everyone talks about eastern europe. as an outsider i see what about the british when they went back into greece in 1944 and started bombing the streets of athens and killing the people, the communist resistors that fought against the nazis. the british were ruthless. that is another point. people say look at what stalin did in poland. he broke the altar. i don't believe they did. i will tell you more about that. look what the british did. but we did increase in the cold war period, the early cold war period we and the truman doctrine of 47 to 49, we had american advisers and early vietnam there were already over increase read the the british coal is truly to get back the mediterranean, along the region's coming get iran back in the conflict in iran in 1945. beyond that, it's crucial. we showed that in the beautiful maps. he gets to the far east and it is the richest resources around known to britain, not us. so then it isn't -- you can't dhaka the u.s. soviet relations without talki
into the incident. workplace officials often fail to adequately enforce workplace safety standards. >> in greece, a bomb has exploded in an athens suburb. no one was hurt, but the explosion damaged adjacent businesses. some have called for banning the anti-immigrant party whose popularity has surged during the greek debt crisis. >> in belfast, protesters have clashed with police over plans to remove britain oppose the union jack flag from city hall. hundreds of protestant demonstrators attempted to storm the building after the majority catholic city voted to take it down. 15 police officers were injured. and these are testing times for a new push by the european union to reconcile serbia and its former southern province. >> although it has been almost five years since costs of a declared independence with western backing, tensions are just as high. still, there are optimists. we talk to the german commander of the nato-led peace keepers in the north of the country for more. >> our coverage begins. >> the bridge links the ethnic albanian and serve parts of the city appeared to this day, it is gua
fledged banking union and bailout loans for greece. what was being done to prevent another global downturn? that was on queen elizabeth's mind as she visited the bank of england. >> trying her hand at high finance, the queen, put in her signature on a special, a bank note. >> it does not improve much. >> the bank note, worth 1 million pounds, seem like small change as the queen and duke of edinburgh were shown the vaults were gold reserves were kept. there are 27 billion pounds of gold in this fault alone. that is not something you see every day, even when you have been doing this sort of thing for 60 years. has the tour went on, talk turned to more serious matters. the queen once asked why nobody had seen the financial crisis coming. officials launched into a three- part lecture on what caused the crisis. the words like "paradigm" flew across the floor. both the duke and the queen listened intently. finally, it became a two-way conversation, and the queen offered a few thoughts of her own. first, a question about the bankers. >> complacency. >> and then a question about the regulator, the
you do is say, we are in trouble, we will borrow in loans and give it to people. that is called greece. that is what the trade minister said. they are not serious about welfare, the deficit, or a serious party. everybody can see it. >> order. >> double very much. will the prime minister join me and the whole crowd in sending our condolences -- we urge anybody who wants to donate to the king edward the seventh memorial fund. >> i am sure the whole house and indeed the whole country will join the honorable lady and join me in paying tribute to this nurse and giving all our sympathies. she clearly loved her job, loved her work, cared deeply about health of her patients, and what has happened is a complete tragedy. there are many lessons that will need to be learned. i echo what she said about what in the press keep their distance. >> is the prime minister still intending to introduce to snooper's chartaer? does he realize that he will be spying and more people in britain than even all the press barons put together? did -- where did he get his advice and ideas from? >> i really believe on
, but will be a couple points worse than greece and spain. so that's a big negative for george osbourne. another one will be getting the percentage of debt compared with gdp in the country, getting that down within a five-year period, getting it syncing in the right direction. he thought it was going to peek around 75%, 75%. it looks like it could go up even further. so let's see what he says on that front today. in terms of options, he has very few options indeed because this is a government which as we know has set its fallout on plan a. and yet, are we seeing real austerity? i'm not entirely sure. government borrowing this fiscal year so far in the five months that we have figures for already is 26.7% higher than the same period a year ago. the idea originally this year was for flat spending and then getting it down there after. and he's having to borrow more and more money, october figures were around 2.6 billion pounds more in borrowing than analysts expected. having to borrow more because tax receipts and corporations are falling. the labor party -- i was speaking to rachel reeves earlier on,
or the interests of the nobles should govern the affairs of men since these questions convulsed greece and rome. he was looking back at greece and rome in the way we look back at the founding to try to figure out how much of this division, how much of the divided opinion is natural, how much is unnatural, and how do you manage and try to do what you can with what we have. and his answer, wonderfully, was in theory he would want to go back to monticello. you know those wonderful quotations, we all know them. oh, if i could only be with my books and at my farm and at my family in the peace and respite of possibility cello. well, you know, the road was open. he could have gone. new york, philadelphia, williamsburg, richmond, paris, london, hold and, i mean, he was everywhere the action was. he was irresistibly drawn to it. because as a young man he'd entered into what he called the bold and doubtful election between submission and the sword. the american revolution shaped him and grabbed him in the way few historical events, i think, have grabbed any generation or any man. i think he thought of the re
, portugal, certainly greece. so you have those economic woes. the euro is not going to thrive and it may survive thanks to the ecb, but you're not going to get that economy to thrive, and the fiscal union ask those are very slow going and though they may be moving quickly by european standards and i've been given the magnitude of the problem going very slowly. >> how should people be thinking about this? the average american, and they've been hearing about it for so long and they're not sure it will affect their pocketbook. do you think they will? >> and there's this incredible chance that greece will leave and the dominos will begin to fall. i think that's unluikely to happen as long as the ecb is willing to support that currency, but will it thrive? will those economies boom? i don't think so, i think it will be another year of recession and you will find individual opportunities and the stock picker's market and far as it's a strong growth, they're not there yet. >> thanks so much for joining us. good to see you tonight. >> you heard piers morgan talk about it with larry last week. af
's called greece. that is whether trade minister said. they are not serious about welfare. they're not serious about the deficit. they are not a serious party, and everyone can see it. >> thank you very much, mr. speaker. will the prime minister join me as i'm sure the whole house in sending our condolences to a nurse who died this week? in urging anyone who said support families, and urging the press to continue their largely good record in preserving the privacy of this and as a time of most terrible grief. >> here, here spent i'm indeed sure the whole house and the whole country will join me in paying tribute to this nurse and giving all our sympathies and condolences to her family. she clearly loved her job, love to work, care deeply about the health of her patients and what's happened is a complete tragedy. it will be many lessons the need to be learned and i echo what she says about the press keeping their distance and allowing this family the time it is face to greek. >> dennis skinner. >> -- faced to grief. >> is the prime minister still intending to introduce the snoope
of ancient rome and greece were thought to ennoble the minds that contemplated them. turner recorded their beauty-- the vestiges of power in ruin, history frozen in atmospheric splendor, a lost paradise still tinged by myth. he could capture that beauty like no one else which earned the praise of his friend the painter thomas lawrence. (reader) "the subtle harmony of this atmosphere, that wraps everything in its own milky sweetness... can only be rendered, according to my belief, by the beauty of his tones." (narrator) turner first saw the seductive beauty of venice in paintings by the 18th century venetian artist canaletto, a favorite of itish collectors. turner's venice from the porch of madonna della salute was designed to appeal to that market. juliet and her nurse, on the other hand, was a breathtaking work of fiction. turner transported shakespeare's characters from verona-- and set them in the lower right-hand corner of a composition that vibrated with the decadent revels of venice at carnival time. rendered in luminous tones, figures and fireworks dissolve in the gossamer atm
. but michael was out in greece. he might tell us what happens when you allow tax increases to chase after spending and you don't have any restraint in all, however works out. gerri: california's just approved a $6 billion tax hike. what can you tell us about our future? >> it is retroactive. active january 1st of 2 dozen 12. it does not start ne yar. it already started. increasing our sales ta. the people run in this whole operation moved to texas. if you want to visit califnia anymore go to dallas, houston, fort worth because that is where people are going. people learn to livesmall, and this is what people understand. my taxes go u maybe al nly give up petty an many every other week. maybe i will get my hair cut every twwes but every three. this is what goes on. and if youraise my taxes i'm going to c cut back somewhere. who gets hurt is the little guy on the totem pole. gerri: rahway ago. thank you for coming on tonight. thank you. all right. yet another big corporations rushing to avoid a huge tax bill on t fiscal cliff. oracle said it uld pay tree of next year's dividends this year.
and greece are also reported to want out. >> it costs to perform, and it costs to stage it. and what do you get back? bluntly a bunch of hoopla and a few pom-poms. it can be uplifting when the times are good. greece won it in 2005, but is it appropriate for the greeks to pump millions or billions in? i think austerity is one reason. but i think also the tone is another. is it right to be celebrating in spandex when your people are out on the streets? >> reporter: looking at some of the countries' economic scorecards, it's hardly surprising. greece is aware that taking part could be an issue. especially as its economy is expected to drop to minus 4.5% next year. portugal, meanwhile, is expected to shrink 1.8%. and poland and slovakia have decided to spend their money on other projects. that's despite projecting positive growth for 2013. ♪ it reportedly costs around $160,000 to take part. and if you win, some countries spend big to host the lavish event. for some national broadcasters, this is reason enough to pull out. >> the cost of staging has been mounting in recent years. russia put on
of trying euro trend. >> that's fine. >> misery loves company. we can have it all forever, like greece. >> we're not greece. and that's the whole point. neither is britain which is pretending its greece, and look where it's getting them. britain's not growing at all. >> would you do some stimulus? >> i probably would, yeah. >> what kind? >> there's a ton of infrastructure that needs to be done in this country. >> then do it. and borrow money -- >> it's free. we can borrow money for free for 30 years in real terms. the market is not telling the u.s. to tighten fiscal policy. it's telling the u.s. to borrow some money. >> can you make sure we only do things -- we're not going to fill high speed rail lines between cities no one wants to travel to? >> if you spend a billion dollars i can't guarantee that every last cent of it is going to be spent properly. >> how moan solyndras will be in that balance? >> only two. >> you have to deal with the issues that krugman never deals with. i love the explanation we should spend spend spend. what happens when interest rates rise? two is you're talki
everywhere at once at all times. and in greece, it was an utter disaster. so, i would love to follow hovering behind him, churchill as he goes from meeting to meeting. and then when he sells his generals on the viability of going to norway or thinking about it, he says no. we will go to some mantra. he gave them fits -- we will go to sumatra. he gave them fits. >> so, you tell all kinds of stories in your. to cover the dunkirk story. what year was dunkirk. where was he in that process? >> the evacuation? >> yes. >> that would be the last week of may, the first few days of june in the 1940's. the french had been defeated essentially in brittany. the french expeditionary force, 100,000 men strong, half of them were stalled of the san -- south of the sienne. the other have spearheaded against the germans, and in short order the french collapsed against belgium. they did it over a week -- at first, they thought they would get 10,000 or 12,000 men out. then anything that could float was sent over there. the got more than 200,000 british troops out. i found it interesting that several thousand fren
. google is flying from south to north. so i think they're kind of mingling right now in greece. so in santorini. this is his dashboard. you can see where he is. there's a lot of games. kids having a ball with it. it shows you where santa is. he's leaving his presence as he moves. he's moving from africa north. so now they kind of just bypassed each other in greece. and now google is now in finland where the other guy is. or similar santa was earlier. they're kind of meeting in the middle. just around the equator. >> here's the thing, we just don't want a midair santa crash. that would be the worst case scenario. thank you so much, alexandria, in an age of e-mails and tweets, here we go. it's nice to know that a letter can still be a powerful tool. it also helps if you have a powerful role model. that would be 9-year-old gabriella miller. she got strangers from around the world to write letters to santa. that out pouring will bring some joy for severely ill children like gabriella herself. now, our affiliate has the story. >> we have a mountain of letters here. >> reporter: chris' c
can think of is greece. host: what does it mean for the pentagon? guest: greece used to be one of the only three non-u.s. countries in nato that was spending 2% of gdp on national security. they are now below that because they cannot afford it. host: democratic caller, new jersey. caller: i am a retired attorney colonel. i've done a lot of research on the federal budget. whenever we start talking about entitlements, and relating it to the annual budget deficit, we're making a mistake. it has no part today in a problem. the spending increases for the war and other things that we basically did not fund, the huge loss in employment in 2007 and 2008 where people stopped paying taxes and started drawing welfare, and number three, we have the tax cuts, the bush tax cuts and the obama tax cuts which have severely reduced the amount of revenue. the tax burden on americans from the federal government today is an 80-year low. we cannot fund the government with the revenues and loss in jobs that we have. host: cbo has done a study. including all parts of the tax cuts, and you have sequest
can be a bit less worried about greece next year than we can be this year, for example, as well as in spain the government is considering a variety of reform efforts. indeed, despite the exchange in governments we had this year, it's the french deposit. when we look at it in aggregate, i think the tailwinds are starting to overcome the headwinds. the headwinds are still going to be there. the fiscal one is very important. there are still going to be risks on the european side. there's still the geopolitics which, of course, we can't ignore here. but in aggregate, i think those tailwinds are starting to get more traction and that's particularly becoming true in the u.s. housing market. >> what's interesting to that point is that we're coming to a year where even some of those concern are going away. central banks are starting to get extraordinarily accommodative. i wonder if their measures haven't been too back end loaded. certainly when you look at japan, it has pursued cycles earlier and had more impact. what about the sense ta whether it's the fed, whether it's the bank of jap
of becoming greece. >> the president's aides not surprisingly quickly rejected the plan which republicans say would bring in $800 billion in higher tax revenue without raising rates. white house communications director said, quote, it actually promises to lower rates for the wealthy and sticks the middle class with the bill. press secretary jay carney said mr. obama is determined to phase out the bush administration tax cuts for families making more than $250,000 a year. >> he will not sign a bill that extends those tax rates for the top 2%. we can't afford it. it is not a wise economic policy or wise fiscal policy. and it would defeat the principle of balance that he has embraced. >> so with less than a month to go before the deadline, we've now had an offer and a counteroffer, but arguably, no real attempt at compromise. democrats say republicans haven't detailed how they would increase tax revenue and they haven't offered enough of it and republicans say democrats haven't agreed to serious entitlement program cuts. steve, gretchen, brian? >> steve: thank you very much, live from the north
the united states in the 1930's and is characterized greece today. the program of 375 billion pounds is 0.25 of an annual nominal gdp flow. a lot of money. bront money is now expanding at over 5% and we will see the impact of that on demand later in 2013. the second action the bank has taken to provide a breathing space before these broad macroeconomic factors feedthrough is to introduce what we call a funding for lending scheme. a special scheme started on the first of august under which the bank of england, with the garden -- guarantee of the governor because this is a cause i-fiscal action, would provide four-year financing for banks to enable them to increase lending to the real economy or at the least, to contract lending to the real economy by less than they would otherwise have done. we will lend to banks according to how much they are expanding their own net lending to the real economy and the more they expand their net lending, the lower the interest rate which will charge on loans to them. there is a powerful financial incentive built into this funding for lending scheme to pers
the country from becoming greece. but i'm not going to set aside the $1.2 trillion in cuts. any hope of going over the fiscal cliff must start in the senate. >> gretchen: a lot of people were upset because members of congress just can't seem to get their act together or the president, depending on which side of the fence that you're on of the they were upset that they went on christmas vacations. the president went to hawaii and members of congress went home. both sides said we're going to come back to washington because we've got to solve the situation. i think what so many people are frustrated about is this is an ongoing situation. it's like every year we come to this point where we're talk being this cliff and this is what i think has angered so many voters and why congress has such a low approval rating. >> rick: they also got to this point because of their last time they did this. it was the last debt creating fight that deleted this thing. now they gave themselves an amount of time to work on it you and thought maybe last week there was a little progress being made. turns out there is
to improve. if you look at countries as lindsey graham said, look at greece and countries like that, you don't want america to be plunged into that almost insolvable crisis. they were sensible and very funny together. a lot of very quiet exchanges with me about the constitution about gay rights and gun control and obviously i come from a country where almost everything is federal in the terms of you have a law for a country. i said in gay marriage, are you going to have a situation with guns where almost every state has different regulations. is it not time in america, perhaps truly was united on these big issues which in the end are about fairness and equality as with gay rights. they weren't having any of that. it gets lively. >> the full interview tonight at 9:00 p.m. eastern. "piers morgan tonight." please come back and visit. >> this is why you get the bond movies and i end up with denzel castoffs. >> some days you may be in a james bond movie too. >> the worst moment of my career was taking my wife to see the bond movie and see your head rear up as the star of the film. >> some day. >>
greece in the uprising against the turks? [laughter] that, by the way, is a very profound joke. if you are an empire that wants to make sure you play by the rules, it is always good to have a group that is discriminated against and they will go off to build an empire. it is very important. it just came to me with that? if you look out the rest of the democratic world, the spaniards, you name it, they're not exactly gung ho about putting their blood on the line when it comes to pursuing our values. the point, i guess, here is that you always have to have somebody who runs the show. there has to be one of very large power. usually it is anglo-saxon. we are now in a phase of american development with the power that has carried the burden over the last 60 years, as we all know, wants to lead from behind and is retracting from afghanistan, from iraq, and they're now exerting their power from afar and from above. drones above, boots on the ground. i fear if nobody takes on the responsibility of organizing and maintaining, it will not be in the of -- will not be india. >> go ahead, minister.
in greece and spain. imagine what the minority unemployment would be if we had a 25% unemployment rate on average. we see pensions being cut without any notice at all. we see social price ramps slashed. so i would think if we can convince the representatives of the so-called disadvantaged groups that there is at least some probability that that will happen to us, i would say a certainty that will happen to us eventually if we don't do something about the situation, i would think there would be much more sober in their demands. but at this moment i don't see it. >> i would say, you know, that a lot of this is, you know, if we are talking inside the beltway, that is a different conversation of we go outside the beltway. part of the disservice that the debate is having today is that it is -- it is steering away from what the real issues are, the most pressing issue, which is the potential for a sovereign debt crisis and more optimistic. you know, steering the conversation away from that. and it is not helping ordinary americans understand what the threat is over a somewhat longer term. of
Search Results 0 to 32 of about 33 (some duplicates have been removed)